Cori Bush says several of her new Republican colleagues in Congress mistakenly called her 'Breonna' after she wore a Breonna Taylor face mask to her first day of work

  • Missouri Representative-elect Cori Bush said that some of her Republican colleagues called her "Breonna" on her first day of Congress because she wore a face mask that said "Breonna Taylor" on it. 
  • Bush told reporters on Friday that her Republican colleagues called her Breonna "several times" and that the remarks were "disheartening" and "absolutely hurtful."
  • But the Democrat, who recently made history after becoming Missouri's first Black congresswoman, tweeted that she's still "glad they'll come to know her name and story because of my presence here." 
  • Taylor, a 26-year-old Black medical worker, was killed on March 13 when Louisville police shot her eight times in her home during a botched drug raid.
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Missouri Representative-elect Cori Bush said that several Republican colleagues mistook her for Breonna Taylor on her first day of Congress on Friday because she was wearing a face mask with Taylor's name on it.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black medical worker from Louisville, Kentucky, was killed when police shot her eight times in her home during a botched drug raid in March.

"It's Day One, so I'm wearing my 'Breonna Taylor' mask," Bush tweeted on Friday. "A few of my Republican colleagues have called me Breonna, assuming that's my name. It hurts."

"But I'm glad they'll come to know her name & story because of my presence here," she continued. "Breonna must be central to our work in Congress." 

The case was one of many that fueled nationwide protests against police brutality.

 

When asked about her tweet by reporters later on in the day, Bush said that her Republican colleagues called her Breonna "several times" and that the remarks were "disheartening" and "absolutely hurtful," according to CBS News.

"This has been national news for a long time. People have protested in the streets with this name and it just saddens me that people that want to be in leadership don't know the struggles that are happening to Black people in this country," she said, according to CBS.

"But it's okay because we'll educate and we'll make sure that people know who she is, what she stood for," Bush added.

The 44-year-old progressive Democrat made history by becoming Missouri's first Black congresswoman earlier this month. She won after beating Republican Anthony Rogers to represent the state's first congressional district.

Bush has long been a vocal activist of the Black Lives Matter movement. She first attracted national attention when she led a protest in Ferguson after the death of Michael Brown in 2014.

In September, the city of Louisville settled a wrongful death lawsuit with Taylor's family, which included a $12 million payout alongside several measures for police reform.  

Forer police officer Brett Hankison was charged with three counts of "wanton endangerment," for putting Taylor's neighbors at risk during the incident.

Hankison's indictment and the three charges do not appear to be directly related to Taylor's death, 

The two other Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in the shooting at her home on March 13 were not charged. 

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